Wednesday, October 7, 2015

Teens With ADHD Are 4 Times More Likely To Be In Car Accident Than Non-ADHD Peers

In light of October being National ADHD Awareness Month, authors of the book "What Teenage Drivers Don't Know: The Unwritten Rules of the Road" provide driving tips of teenagers with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), who are four times more likely to be in a car accident than their non-ADHD peers.

In light of October being National ADHD Awareness Month, authors of the book "What Teenage Drivers Don't Know: The Unwritten Rules of the Road" provide driving tips of teenagers with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), who are four times more likely to be in a car accident than their non-ADHD peers.

According to a press release on PRNewswire, the book also gives parents advice on how to deal with the anxiety that comes with handing the car keys to a teen.

"We believe every parent and young teen in America should have access to this book," explains co-author John Harmata. "In particular, parents of children with ADHD should start instilling the lessons of good driving as early as age 13 or 14. Our book covers what driver's education leaves out, such as handling bad weather or night driving, maintaining a vehicle and navigating the traffic court system."

The press statement reports that speeding and failure to yield are some of the more common moving violations for those with ADHD. Lack of attention can lead these drivers to ignore speed limit signs or to drive too fast to avoid being late.

In addition, the impulsive tendency of those with ADHD can encourage risky, reckless behaviors, even behind the wheel.

Other statistics from the book's website reveal that in 2013, per mile driven in the U.S., average teen drivers ages 16 to 19 were three times more likely than those ages 20 and older to be in a fatal crash.

Teenage drivers with ADHD, compared to other teens, were also seven times as likely to have been in two or more accidents.

As we previously reported, as many as 6 million students are identified as having ADHD.

One in five public school students experience learning disabilities and attention issues.

"This is a time for parents, educators, and policymakers to understand how these disabilities impact students and their families, to reflect on the significant achievements that these students have made, and to renew our commitment to creating a stronger future for them," U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said in a statement.

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